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HISTORY 2V03 Re-MakingHistory

Academic Year: Winter 2017

Term: Winter

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. Ian McKay

Email: mckayi@mcmaster.ca

Office: Chester New Hall 632

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 24137

Website:

Office Hours: By appointment.



Course Objectives:

Course Description:

Welcome to History 2V03, “Making History.” The purpose of this ‘participatory course’ is to decide, by majority vote, if the result of the Canadian federal election of 1917 should be upheld. Were Canadians right to re-elect the Borden government and impose a policy of conscription? Or should Canadians repudiate the election and the policy of conscription? Was the Great War of 1914-18 the founding of Canada or a crisis of Canada? In 2017, it falls to the students of McMaster University to determine whether this election should stand or fall.

In the first sitting of the course, each student will select one of two tutorial groups, which function as “parties” throughout the course. Group A will consist of people who are inclined to uphold the result in 1917. Group B will consist of people who are inclined to question the result in 1917. Both groups will do many of the same readings, but the idea is to use the readings to develop your own perspective on the War and Conscription.

It is important to note that a central course requirement is your attendance at and participation in the end-of-course conference and banquet on 6 and 7 April 2017. **Please note that the end of the course banquet and conference will be held outside of normal class hours.**


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Here are the books for review:

Will R. Bird, And We Go On: A Memoir of the Great War (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2014).

Jeffrey A. Keshen, Propaganda and Censorship During Canada’s Great War (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 1996).             

Ian Miller, Our Glory and Our Grief: Torontonians and the Great War (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014).

Amy J. Shaw, Crisis of Conscience: Conscientious Objection in Canada during the First World War (Vancouver and Toronto: UBC Press, 2009).

Timothy Winegard, For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2014).


Method of Assessment:

Marking Scheme and Assignments:

1. Participation in the Weekly Seminar—40%  

All students are required to have completed the readings each week and to have circulated to their group at least two questions based on those readings. One or two students will find primary sources for each week (and present them to the class) to count towards their participation mark. The tutor will also assess your work in preparation for the class conference.

Participation weekly seminars is mandatory. Students who unavoidable miss a seminar will have to see me in order to arrange for additional written work to make up the readings they have not done. In addition, as noted above, each student will be required to lead at least one seminar discussion, which will involve a 15-minuite presentation of the central themes and questions prompted by the readings and the pre-circulation of five “leading questions.”

2. Book Review—due 8 February—20%

In this essay of about 1500 words, with double-spaced lines, you should do three things: (1) tell your reader about the core arguments and themes of the book you have selected; (b) place the book in its context—with what other books is this book in conversation? and (c) assess the book—do you think it helps us understand this period in Canadian history? Did you yourself find it a good introduction to this period of history?

Here are the books for review:

Will R. Bird, And We Go On: A Memoir of the Great War (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2014).

Jeffrey A. Keshen, Propaganda and Censorship During Canada’s Great War (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 1996).

Ian Miller, Our Glory and Our Grief: Torontonians and the Great War (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014).

Amy J. Shaw, Crisis of Conscience: Conscientious Objection in Canada during the First World War (Vancouver and Toronto: UBC Press, 2009).

Timothy Winegard, For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2014).

 

Assignments may be submitted electronically, but responsibility for making sure a given essay has been received by the instructor resides with the student. A penalty of 5% per working day is assessed on all late essays.

Students are strongly advised to retain a physical copy of any written work submitted for a part of their mark.

3. Conference Poster or Paper — due 4 April 2016—20%

In collaboration with your tutor, you should prepare a poster or a position paper that fits in with your group’s strategy for the conference. One option is to draw up a poster that would feature in your group’s display room during the event. Here you are strongly encouraged to use the visual resources of the Archives in creating a poster that offers an original perspective on the war, based on primary sources (that is, sources that come from the years 1914-18).

Another option is to draw up a short position paper or speech on one aspect of the Conscription Debate that might be of assistance to your group in the conference. In both cases, what you decide to do should be shaped by conversations with your tutor and fellow group members.

In this position paper of 2000 words, you should develop the argument for your side of the conscription election, in close liaison with your tutor and your tutor and party.

4. Conference Participation—20%

Your tutor will evaluate how well you contributed to your party’s activities in the end-of-year conference.

Your mission at the conference is to assist your group to prevail in the Great Debate of 1917. There will be three components to the event:

[1] Reliving history. In this part of the conference, each group will, through posters, presentations, or dramatic re-enactments, give us a first-hand feel for how your side experienced the debate of 1917. Here the point is to be as true as possible to the atmosphere of 1917.

(2) Arguing history. In this part of the conference, we will have a formal debate about conscription, with each group presenting its side of the question as it appeared to your side. Here you should also remain true to the atmosphere of 1917, but you may also draw upon the wider perspectives you have gained from your readings and conference preparation.

(3) Reflecting on history. In this part of the conference, each group will, from the standpoint of 2017, present its interpretation of the conscription crisis in historical perspective.

The conscription debate was a very emotional moment in Canadian history, one which many say threatened the very foundations of the country itself. In reflecting the sentiments of the time, bear in mind that if your side hopes to prevail at the conference, you will need to persuade some people from the other side to support your position.

The winning side will be determined by (a) a vote by secret ballot at the banquet and (b)the adjudication of an expert panel. Students who have made a particularly distinguished contribution will be honoured.  The winning side shall receive both recognition and a handsome reward, as well as the honour of having prevailing in Canada’s most contentious election.

Additional speakers and special events will also be included in the conference. Be prepared for a lively weekend!


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Assignments may be submitted electronically, but responsibility for making sure a given essay has been received by the instructor resides with the student. A penalty of 5% per working day is assessed on all late essays.

Students are strongly advised to retain a physical copy of any written work submitted for a part of their mark.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Detailed Syllabus (Some readings are subjected to change)

Wednesday 4 January 2017
3:30 Welcome to the Course/Selection of Tutorial Groups

Friday 6 January 2017

3:30 Archives Excursion

In this trip to the McMaster Archives, you will be introduced to the university’s impressive holdings.

Wednesday 11 January 2017

Conscription in Canadian History
1:30 Tutorial Group A
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Byers, Daniel. “Conscription and Canadian History, 1627-1939.” In Zombie Army: The Canadian Army and Conscription in the Second World War, 13-40. (UBC Press: Toronto and Vancouver, 2016).
3:30 Lecture/Canada in 1914

Friday 13 January 2017
3:30 Lecture/British Imperialism as a Faith and a Culture

Wednesday 18 January 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Imperialism and Recruitment
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Brown, Robert Craig and Donald Loveridge. “Unrequited Faith: Recruiting the Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1918.” Canadian Military History 24, no. 1 (Winter/Spring 2015): 61-87.
3:30 Lecture/Quebec, Modernity, and Nationalism

Friday 20 January 2017
3:30 Lecture/The World Descends Into War

Wednesday 25 January 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Nationalism and Nationhood
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Mann, Jatinder. “‘To the Last Man and the Last Shilling’ and ‘Ready, Aye Ready:’ Australian and Canadian Conscription Debates during the First World War.” Australian Journal of Politics and History 61, no. 2 (June 2015): 184-200.
3:30 Lecture/A Liberal Order Goes to War 

Friday 27 January 2017
3:30 Lecture/Laurier, Borden, and the Nationalistes in 1911

Wednesday 1 February 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Working Class Impact and the Wealthy
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Djebabla, Mourad. “‘Fight or Farm:’ Canadian Farmers and the Dilemma of the War Effort in World War One (1914-1918). Canadian Military Journal 13, no. 2 (Spring 2013): 57-67.
Tough, David. “‘The rich ... should give to such an extent that it will hurt:’ ‘Conscription of Wealth’ and Political Modernism in the Parliamentary Debate on the 1917 Income War Tax.” Canadian Historical Review 93, no. 3 (September 2012): 382-407.
3:30 Lecture/The Adventure of War 

Friday 3 February 2017
3:30 Lecture/The Women’s Question

Wednesday 8 February 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Propaganda Culture
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Keelan, Geoff. “Canada’s Cultural Mobilization during the First World War and a Case for Canadian War Culture.” Canadian Historical Review 97, no. 3 (September 2016): 377-403.
3:30 Lecture/The Business of War

Friday 10 February 2017
3:30 Lecture/The Religion Question

Wednesday 15 February 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Experience at the Front
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Hyatt, AMJ. “Sir Arthur Currie and Conscription: A Soldier’s View.” Canadian Historical Review 50, no. 3 (September 1969): 285-296.
3:30 Lecture/Experiencing the Western Front

Friday 17 February 2017
3:30 Lecture/The Emergent Resistance to the War

MID-TERM BREAK

Wednesday 1 March 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/French-Canadian Response
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Trepanier, James. “Helping ‘nos chers conscrits:’ The Knights of Columbus Catholic Army Huts and French-Canadian Nationalism, 1917-1926.” Journal of Canadian Studies 47, no. 2 (Spring 2013): 246-267.
Theobald, Andrew. “Un Loi Extraordinaire: New Brunswick Acadians and the Conscription Crisis of the First World War.” Acadiensis 34, no. 1 (Autumn 2004): 80-95.
3:30 Lecture/French Canada and the War 

Friday 3 March 2017
3:30 Lecture/The Coming of Conscription

Wednesday 8 March 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Marginalized Response
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Brookfield, Tarah. “Divided by the Ballot Box: The Montreal Council of Women and the 1917 Election.” Canadian Historical Review 89, no. 4 (December 2008): 473-501.
McGowan, Katharine. “‘Until We Receive Just Treatment:’ The Fight Against Conscription in the Naas Agency, BC.” BC Studies 167 (Autumn 2010): 47-70.
3:30 Lecture/ Ethnic and Racial Minorities and the War

Friday 10 March 2017
3:30 Lecture/War and Cultural Modernity

Wednesday 15 March 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Mobilizing Religion
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Keelan, Geoff. “Catholic Neutrality: The Peace of Henri Bourassa.” Journal of the Canadian Historical Association 22, no. 1 (2011): 99-132.
Heath, Gordon L. “The Protestant Denominational Press and the Conscription Crisis in Canada, 1917-1918.” Historical Studies 78 (2012): 27-46.
3:30 Lecture/What Would Jesus Do?

Friday 17 March 2017
3:30 Lecture/The Transformation of the Liberal State

Wednesday 22 March 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Civil Suppression
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Auger, Martin F. “On the Brink of Civil War: The Canadian Government and the Suppression of the 1918 Quebec Easter Riots.” Canadian Historical Review 89, no. 4 (December 2008): 503-540.
3:30 Lecture/The Coming of the Election of 1917

Friday 24 March 2017
3:30 Lecture/Fighting the Election of 1917

Wednesday 29 March 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Remembering 1917
2:30 Tutorial Group B
Theobald, Andrew. “Divided Once More: Social Memory and the Canadian Conscription Crisis of the First World War.” Past Imperfect 12 (2006): 1-19.
3:30 Lecture/The Logic of Conscription

Friday 31 March 2017
3:30 Lecture/Resistance to Conscription

Wednesday 5 April 2017
1:30 Tutorial Group A/Conference Preparation
2:30 Tutorial Group B/Conference Preparation
3:30 Lecture/The Cultural Legacy of the War

Thursday 6 April
1:30 /Start of the “Making History” Conference
7:00/Special Lecture: Christopher Moore
9:00/Conference Social

Friday 7 April
1:00/“Making History” Conference
6:00/Banquet and Voting
8:00/Prize Awards and Closing Ceremonies

 


Other Course Information:

Tutorial Schedule:        Wednesday: Group A: 1:30-2:20, Group B: 2:30-3:20

Assistants:                   Dr. Maxime Dagenais and Sarah Whitwell