Have a Question? Contact the Humanities Office or an Academic Unit

HISTORY 2T03 Canadian History: Up To 1885

Academic Year: Fall 2017

Term: Fall

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Prof. Stacy Nation-Knapper

Email: nationks@mcmaster.ca

Office: L.R. Wilson Hall 2008

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 28152

Website:

Office Hours: Fri. 1:30-2:30 PM and by appointment



Course Objectives:

Course Objectives:

Students enrolled in History 2T03 will complete the course with a foundational understanding of the principles of historical thinking and methods of creating history. In addition to this foundational understanding about the historical profession, students will develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills and will be prepared to undertake upper-level history courses.

 

Course Description:

This course examines some of the diverse groups of people who lived in or visited the area now called Canada during the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, as well as some of the major historical themes and contexts of the era. We will focus on how Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous settlers created and reacted to the social, environmental, economic, and political changes of this period, from contact and the early European colonial period to the experiment and fallout of Confederation, up to the western resistance events of 1885.

 

We will reflect on what we can learn from Canada’s past and how history has served the needs of Canada’s ever-shifting present. This will include exploring how and why history is created.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Required:

John Douglas Belshaw, Canadian History: Pre-Confederation (B.C. Open Textbook Project, 2015). Available online at http://opentextbc.ca/preconfederation/.

 

Other readings will be available online through the McMaster Library’s website and/or through links found in the syllabus.


Method of Assessment:

Method of Assessment:

Tutorial Participation: 15%

Historiography Assignment: 15%

Mid-Term Exam: 15%

Public History Review Essay: 30%

Final Exam: 25%

 

 

Key Dates:

Oct. 7 – Historiography Assignment Due at the Beginning of Class

Oct. 28 – Mid-Term Exam

Dec. 2 – Public History Review Essay Due at the Beginning of Class

TBA – Final Exam

 

Tutorial Participation (15%)

The ability to formulate ideas and discuss them in a critical and analytical fashion is an important skill, not only for historical work but also for life outside of university. Tutorial participation makes up a substantial part of your grade for this reason. Students are expected to attend tutorials having completed each week’s assigned material and to be prepared to make regular contributions to class discussion, in both small group and larger seminar formats. Your tutorial leader will be responsible for assigning your participation grade and will provide you with an outline of what is expected from you in tutorials.

 

Historiography Exercise (15%)

The purpose of this assignment is to demonstrate an understanding of how different historians approach similar historical topics. Studying these interpretations of the past is known as historiography, and it is an important aspect of what historians do.

All students will write a short essay (750-1,000 words) that analyzes two different historical accounts.

 

Public History Review Essay (30 %)

Canada’s past is represented in many different ways – most of them outside of the classroom. Studying these different, non-academic historical representations is called public history. Results can include exhibits and/or presentations, films, websites, commemorative plaques, monuments, publications, and podcasts. Students will review one work of public history on the period covered in this class. To aid students in their essays, a list of possible topics will be made available. Other topics MUST be cleared with the instructor or with your tutorial leader.

 

Mid-Term and Final Exams (15% and 25%)

You will write two exams for this course: an in-class, mid-term exam and a final exam during the end-of-term exam period. The mid-term exam will focus mainly on short answer questions while the final exam will incorporate longer essay answers. More information will be given about these closer to the exam dates.


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

 

Missed Work and Late Penalties

Late assignments will be penalized 3% per day and will not be accepted after more than two weeks. Your tutorial leader will give you specific instructions on how they prefer to receive late assignments. Extensions will be granted only if requested more than 48 hours in advance of the assignment’s due date and will be up to your tutorial leader’s discretion.

 

What if I miss a lecture?

If you miss a lecture, it is your responsibility to catch up on the material you have missed. Lecture notes and slides will not be posted online.

 

Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

 

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

 

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Topics and Readings:

 

Week 1 - Beginnings

Sept. 6: Introduction

Sept. 8: From Time Immemorial

 

Week 2 – Indigenous and European Contact

Sept. 13: Contacts, Exploration, and Resources

Sept. 15: Ecological Imperialism

 

Week 3 – French Colonialism in North America

Sept. 20: French Society in North America

Sept. 22: Power Struggles and Diplomacy

 

Week 4 – Empires Reconfigured 1730s-1812

Sept. 27: Changing French and Indigenous Relationships in Eastern North America

Sept. 29: Creating British North America and the United States

 

Week 5 – Colonizing the Northwest 1763-1850

Oct. 4: Turning Points

Oct. 6: The Fur Trade and “Exploration”

** Historiography Assignment Due at the Beginning of Class**

 

Week 6 – Fall Recess, No Classes

 

Week 7 – Expansion of British North America (1815-38)

Oct. 18: Social and Economic Changes

Oct. 20: Power and its Discontents

 

Week 8 – Canada United?

Oct. 25: 1837-1838: The Fallout of Revolution

Oct. 27: **Mid-Term Exam**

 

Week 9 – Transatlantic Communities

Nov. 1: Immigration and Urbanization

Nov. 3: Social and Environmental Change

 

Week 10 – Rethinking the State in British North America (1837-67)

Nov. 8: Responsible Government

Nov. 10: Education and Punishment: The Birth of the Modern State

 

Week 11 – Confederation: Inclusion and Exclusion (1858-1873)

Nov. 15: The Context of 1867

Nov. 17: Creating and Expanding Canada

 

Week 12 – The Canadian Empire

Nov. 22: Clearing the Plains

Nov. 24: Inventing Canada

 

Week 13 – Canada to 1885

Nov. 29: Building Railways and Controlling Immigration

***Final Papers Due at the Beginning of Class***

Dec. 1: The Northwest Resistance

 

Week 14 – Wrap Up

Dec. 6: The Legacies of Canada’s Early History/Exam Review