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HISTORY 4S03 The German Reformation

Academic Year: Fall 2017

Term: Fall

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. Megan Armstrong

Email: marmstr@mcmaster.ca

Office: Chester New Hall 626

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 24141

Website:

Office Hours: Tues 10:30-11:30am



Course Objectives:

Description of the Course

This seminar will introduce students to some of the most innovative and influential scholarship on Europe during the period of the German Reformation (c. 1500-1600). The focus will be on religion, specifically as a formative cultural influence. Students will discuss the German Reformation in particular from a variety of perspectives including religious belief (theology), violence, gender, intolerance/co-existence, and the construction of the early modern state. Students will work intensively upon the production of a research paper on some facet of Reformation Europe.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

 

Readings (books found in bookstore)

Denis Janz, Reformation Reader: Primary Texts With Introductions. Fortress Press; 2nd edition (2008)

Sara Nalle, Mad for God: Bartolome Sanchez, the Secret Messiah of Cardenete

 

* = articles found on Avenue to Learn.

 

Avenue to Learn

In this course we will be using Avenue to Learn. In addition to assigned articles, you will find lecture outlines and study sheets posted here. Specific documents and articles will also be posted on Avenues to Learn when indicated, including for the final research paper.

 

Students should be aware that, when they access the electronic components of this course, private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e-mail accounts, and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course. The available information is dependent on the technology used. Continuation in this course will be deemed consent to this disclosure. If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure please discuss this with the course instructor.


Method of Assessment:

Grading Scheme

Participation in Seminar 30%

Historiography Paper, max 900 wrds  20%

Primary Source Paper (max 600 wrds) (Feb 25) 10%

Research Paper (4000 wrds) 40%

 

Class Participation

Students are expected to attend each class and be prepared to discuss the assigned readings. It is equally important that you participate actively in class discussion by raising questions and positing interpretations. This is a significant portion of your final grade.

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS

Historiographic paper ( 900 words)

The purpose of this assignment is to have students grapple with history as an interpretive discipline while preparing for the research paper. For this assignment, students will select three secondary sources (a mix of books and articles, all published since 1980) that are relevant to their research. In this paper students must assess the nature and utility of each source for developing their own research. They must understand the author’s argument, selection of primary sources, theoretical and/or methodological approach. They should, furthermore, consider the following questions: Why is the author useful for my own work? Does it offer a differing or supportive opinion/evidence? Does it neglect to take into consideration critical evidence? Has this scholarly work been influential in the field and if so, why?

 

 

Primary source paper (600 words)

Students will also produce a short analysis of one primary source that will be important to your final paper. Students will identify the source, and explain its importance for developing your own understanding of the chosen topic of your final paper.

 

Research Paper ( 4000 words)

The purpose of this assignment is to hone your writing and analytical skills. For a fourth year paper we expect a polished product. Papers should be well-organized, clearly argued and incorporate both primary and secondary sources. The final version is due the week of March 30. I am willing to mark draft versions if received NO LATER than March 17.th


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Please note: late papers will be penalized 3% a day including weekends. Students will give their essays to their tutorial assistant or to the instructor in class time. Essays may not be submitted by email or fax. Students are also expected to keep a copy of their paper. It is also the policy of this course that students cannot expect to rewrite their papers or borrow class notes from their instructors.

 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

McMaster University and the Department of History states unequivocally that it demands scholarly integrity from all its members. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of higher learning; furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to those students who pursue their studies honestly.

 

Academic dishonesty consists of misrepresenting by deception or by other fraudulent means and can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

 

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various kinds of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, specifically Appendix 3, located at:

http://www.mcmaster.ca/senate/academic/ac_integrity.htm

 

The following illustrate only three of the various forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

 

Plagiarism and any other form of academic dishonesty will not be accepted in this course. If you are at all unsure what constitutes plagiarism, please consult with your tutorial instructor.

 

 

Email Communication

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from the student's own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student. Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

 

 

Respectful Behaviour

The lecture hall and tutorial room are sites of learning. For this reason, disruptive

behaviour such as talking during lectures, cell phone usage, persistent lateness, and

disrespectful language will not be tolerated by your instructors.

 

 

Modifications to Course Outline

The instructor and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during

the term. The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in

extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable

notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the

opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of the student to check their

McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

DISCUSSION SCHEDULE

WEEK 1 (Sept 5)

Introduction

 

WEEK 2 (Sept 12)

The Catholic Tradition in Europe: An Overview

*Megan Armstrong, “ Roman Catholicism circa 1500” in Cambridge History of Religions in America

Janz Reader:

Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ, 4-

Boniface VIII, Unam Sanctam, 13-14

Leo X, Pastor Aeternus, 14

 

WEEK 3 (Sept 19)

Medieval Religious Practices

*Charles Zika, “hosts, processions and pilgrimages in fifteenth-century Germany”

*Carolyn Bynum Walker, “Fast, Feast, and Flesh: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women,” Representations 11 (1985): 1-25.

*Virginia Reinburg, “Liturgy and the Laity”

 

WEEK 4 ( Sept 26)

Martin Luther

Janz Reader, pp. 75-117

 

WEEK 5 (Oct 3) Printing and Religious Reform

 

Janz Reader, Desiderius Erasmus, In Praise of Folly, 63-

*Shannon MacSheffrey, “Heresy, Orthodoxy and English Vernacular Religion 1480-1525” Past and Present 186 (2005): 47-80.

*Alexandra Walsham, “Domme Preachers? Post-Reformation English Catholicism and the Culture of Print.” Past and Present 168 (2000): 72-123

**Historiographic paper due in class

 

WEEK 6 (Oct 10th) MID-TERM RECESS

 

WEEK 7 (Oct 17)

The Spanish Inquisition

Sara Nalle, Mad for God: Bartolome Sanchez, the Secret Messiah of Cardenete

 

 

WEEK 8 (Oct 24)

Calvin and Anabaptism

Janz, Anabaptism: 183-195; 200-212; Calvinism: 270-287

*Jeffrey Watt, “Women and the Consistory in Calvin’s Geneva,” Sixteenth Century Journal 24 (1993): 429-439

*Bill Naphy, “Church riots and Social Unrest in Calvin’s Geneva,” SCJ 26 (1995): 87-97

 

WEEK 9 ( Oct 31): Sacrality and Sacred Spaces

*Benjamin Kaplan, “Fictions of Privacy: House Chapels and the Spatial Accommodation of Religious Dissent in Early Modern Europe,” American Historical Review 107 (2002): 1030 -1064


*Andrew Spicer, “'What kinde of house a kirk is': Conventicles, Consecrations, and the Concept of Sacred Space in post-Reformation Scotland,” in Will Coster and Andrew Spicer, eds., Sacred Space in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2005), 81-103

*Guy Lazure, “Possessing the Sacred: Monarchy and Identity in Phillip II’s Relic Collection at the Escorial” Renaissance Quarterly 60 (2007): 58-93.

 

**Primary source paper due

 

WEEK 10 (Nov 6) Reformation and the Family

*Lyndal Roper, “Going to Church and Street: Weddings in Reformation Augsburg”

*David Cressy, “ Purification, Thanksgiving and the Churching of Women in Post-Reformation England”

*Robert Kingdon, “Social Welfare in Calvin’s Geneva” The American Historical Review 76 (1971): 50-69.

 

 

  1. 11 (Nov 13) Research Time

 

WEEK 12 (Nov 20) Persecution and Conversion

*Brian Pullan, “The Conversion of the Jews: The Style of Italy”

*Brian Levack, “The Great Scottish Witch Hunt of 1661-1662,” Journal of British Studies 20 (1980): 90-108.

*Phil Benedict, “The Saint Bartholomew’s Massacres in the Provinces” The Historical Journal 21 (1978): 205-225.

 

**Deadline for draft papers in class

 

WEEK 13 (Nov 27) The Reformation Debate

*Robert Scribner, “The Reformation, Popular Magic, and the “Disenchantment of the World,” Journal of Interdisciplinary History 23 (1993): 475-494

*Scott Hendrix, “Re-rooting the Faith: The Reformation as Rechristianization,” Church History 69 (2000): 558-577.

*Wolfgang Reindhard, “Reformation, Counter-Reformation, and the Early Modern STAte a Reassessment” Catholic Historical Review (1989): 383-404.

Draft Papers returned

 

WEEK 14 (Dec 5)

**Final Paper due Dec 8

 


Other Course Information:

Please note, the instructor retains the right to make changes to the syllabus before classes begin